15 Minutes of…….Fame?

Have you heard of Love Island? I hadn’t until today but, apparently 4 times as many people apply to take part in it than apply to go to Oxbridge (Oxford or Cambridge Universities). Why? Well, this is just my opinion you understand, because the former offers the chance of instant ‘fame’ and oodles of cash and the latter requires a lot of hard work and effort. 

Have you heard of Love Island? I hadn’t until today but, apparently 4 times as many people apply to take part in it than apply to go to Oxbridge (Oxford or Cambridge Universities). Why? Well, this is just my opinion you understand, because the former offers the chance of instant ‘fame’ and oodles of cash and the latter requires a lot of hard work and effort.

love-islandIn an attempt to understand this latest televisual phenomenon I had a look at an article in the Independent Newspaper and, I’ve got to be honest, I didn’t understand a word of it; Chaucer made more sense to me than this article! Still, not to be deterred I continued with my investigation and found something that explained the ‘plot’…..I think. Someone please correct me if I’m wrong but the idea seems to be that a group of young, physically attractive men and women are put together in a villa in Spain, things happen and someone wins £50,000 – is that about the size of it? Apparently, when the show is over, a fair few of the contestants, at least the popular ones, then go on to make more cash by endorsing products and generally being a ‘celebrity’.

I’ve got to admit, I don’t really get reality TV; why not just look out of the window if you want to see reality or, better yet, go outside and experience it. However, I do understand people who want to take part, don’t we all want our 15 minutes of fame? I just wish that the 80,000+ people who auditioned had slightly higher aspirations than getting their kit off on television and having their every waking moment filmed for the vicarious pleasure of their ‘fans’. I also wish that something more was required of the contestants than just to look beautiful and that the show had some other purpose than to promote the idea that you can get something for nothing in life…….After all there is no skill in being attractive, that’s just the luck of the genes.

oxford graduationMaybe this is just harmless entertainment but I do wonder why more young people seem to aspire to celebrity than academia; yes, you can get your 15 minutes of fame but then what? At least with an Oxbridge education you are pretty much guaranteed work anywhere in the World but as a Z list celebrity what have you got to look forward to as you get older – reality I suppose…

What do you think? I’d love to hear from you

Lisa

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No S**t Sherlock.

I wonder how many more ‘studies’ will need to be commissioned and how many more campaigns chefs will have to embark on before people realise the simple truth – if you feed your children fattening foods and don’t encourage them to exercise – they will get fat?

Apparently if parents and grandparents are obese then, the likelihood is, that the children will be obese according to a recent study; shocker! The researchers didn’t speculate as to why this may be the case but the newspaper that published the study was kind enough to point out that it could be something to do with the adults having a preference for fattening foods! Feel free to join me in a collective eye roll…..

shocked babyIn another shocking discovery – children who are severely overweight will be more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes in later life and, wait for it, if they lose the weight as they arrive into adult hood the risk is then the same as everyone else’s; well I never! I wonder how many more ‘studies’ will need to be commissioned and how many more campaigns chefs will have to embark on before people realise the simple truth – if you feed your children fattening foods and don’t encourage them to exercise – they will get fat?

Kids learn from their parents and other adults in their lives; they watch and they listen to everything that is said and done. As youngsters they don’t have the intellectual capacity to differentiate between the things that will benefit them and those that will have a negative impact. For instance, if a child is told that they are loved and that love is demonstrated by hugs and smiles, it’s something that they can easily relate to; we all like to be told that we’re loved and it’s a fundamental need in most human beings.

Love burgerHowever, what if the child then hears from the people that they’re learning from “I just love burgers and fries, I could eat them for every meal” and what if they see the same smiles adults use when they say they love them bestowed on a giant, jelly filled doughnut? The same applies to negativity. Children pick up on facial expressions and exclamations of dislike or distaste; if your little ones are trying to find our how much toothpaste is in a tube by squeezing it all over the bathroom, sometimes just a look of intense disapproval can be enough to make them reconsider their actions. What if you have that same look on your face when your restaurant meal arrives with vegetables that you don’t like? If you turn your nose up at salads and look aghast when your local takeaway has run out of coco-cola do you think that your children are going to lecture you on the nutritional benefits of healthy foods v high sugar sodas? No, of course not, they’re going to copy you because that’s what kids do….

Fat mum and childRates of obesity in the UK and the US are increasing with each generation and everyone is bleating about it, wringing their hands and wondering what to do. In the UK the Government is considering implementing a programme in schools whereby kids are routinely weighed and, if they’re considered obese, they will receive home visits and free gym classes (well paid for by the tax payer but you get the picture). It’s something I suppose but it can only work in the parents are on board and, if the parents see nothing wrong in eating junk food or ready meals every day then what’s going to change? The same applies to exercise – if the parents are couch potatoes who encourage their children to spend their free time in front of a computer rather than in the park playing football, from whom is the child going to learn the health benefits of exercise.

Yes, schools can make children aware of the need for a healthy diet and exercise but who’s going to educate the parents? I don’t know what the answer is for such a large scale problem other than to promote the positives of a life style that’s more McMotherNature than McDonalds………..

Diet Decision

Yes, We Are All Individuals

So, on the one hand we have groups who campaign against purveyors of junk food and sugary beverages and on the other we have groups who campaign for their right to eat whatever they damn well please. What we don’t seem to have anywhere in the middle are individuals who have received enough nutritional education to make their food choices based on knowledge rather than what one crowd or another is telling them to do

Does anyone remember the wonderfully irreverent film Life of Brian? Specifically the scene where Brian tries to persuade a huge crowd to stop following him by telling them that they don’t need a leader because they are all individuals? The ironic response was ‘Yes! We are all individuals’……in complete unison…….with only one dissenting voice which was immediately shushed by the crowd. It seemed hugely amusing at the time but I do wonder if it has become our reality.

offering candyThere was an article in the news recently in which a healthy eating campaigner criticised a shop for putting huge quantities of chocolate bars close to the checkout complaining that they were ‘cashing in on our sweet tooth’. So, effectively what he is saying is that ‘we’ are incapable of resisting temptation and that the blame for the negative results that arise from an individual’s bad food choices i.e. obesity should rest with a shop?? When did we stop taking responsibility for our own actions? In this instance, what the critic seems to ignore is that no-one is standing by the check out forcing free candy on unwitting shoppers; people make a choice – to buy or not to buy….

The same logic (if you want to call it that) is used by Government when implement ideas like the sugar tax; it’s a blanket response to something which is an individual’s problem. Taxes on tobacco and alcohol haven’t stopped people smoking or drinking because, when you’re dealing with an addiction, the price is pretty much irrelevant. churchill quoteUnfortunately this type of action is also likely to provoke far more negative responses than positive; after all how many people are ever happy when a new tax is introduced? It also means that people will be inclined to band together to stop what they view as oppression by the Government – there is even a Twitter group which has been set up to oppose the sugar tax and says that the ‘it’s not nutritious brigade’ are forcing their choices on the rest of us.

So, on the one hand we have groups who campaign against purveyors of junk food and sugary beverages and on the other we have groups who campaign for their right to eat whatever they damn well please. What we don’t seem to have anywhere in the middle are individuals who have received enough nutritional education to make their food choices based on knowledge rather than what one crowd or another is telling them to do.

BlameWe all have the opportunity to learn about our food choices and what impact they can have on our health; the internet is absolutely awash with information. However, it seems as though people are far more likely to rely on the information provided to them in bite sized pieces by one self-interested group or another than to trust their own decision making. It’s easy to blame the Government or shop-keepers or schools for the current obesity epidemic, it’s far more difficult to take responsibility as individuals but, as the film said, we are all individuals.